Course Offerings Spring Term 2020-2021

For updated course times, please consult the offical course schedule on PeopleSoft.

GER 0101 – Beginning German 1

Times: MWF 11:05-11:55am (Malandro), MWF 1:15pm-2:05pm (Malandro)

This is the first part of our elementary language course sequence. In these proficiency-oriented courses students begin to learn how to communicate in German. The course emphasizes all four skills - speaking, listening, reading, and writing - and introduces students to the culture of the German-speaking countries. Students will be working towards the A1-level of the Common European Framework of Reference. Students should plan to take German 0102 during the following semester.

 

GER 0102 – Beginning German 2

Times: MWF 10:00-10:50 (Kurash), MWF 11:05-11:55 (Kurash)

This is the second part of our elementary language course sequence. In these proficiency-oriented courses students begin to learn how to communicate in German. The course emphasizes all four skills - speaking, listening, reading, and writing - and introduces students to the culture of the German-speaking countries. Students will be working towards the A2-level of the Common European Framework of Reference. Students should plan to take either German 0103 or German 0203 during the following semester.

Attributes: DSAS Second Language General Ed. Requirement

 

GER 0103 – Beginning German 3

Times: MWF 10:00-10:50 (Malandro)

This is the third part of our elementary language course sequence. In these proficiency-oriented courses students begin to learn how to communicate in German. The course emphasizes all four skills - speaking, listening, reading, and writing - and introduces students to the culture of the German-speaking countries. Students will continue to work towards the A2-level of the Common European Framework of Reference. Students should plan to take German 201 during the following semester.

 

GER 0201 – Intermediate German 1

Times: MWF 10:00-10:50 (Lukic)

This is the first part of our intermediate language course sequence. These courses will provide students with opportunities to further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, to strengthen their grammatical knowledge and expand their vocabulary. Students will begin to work towards the B1-level of the Common European Framework of Reference. Students should plan to take German 202 during the following semester.

Attributes: DSAS Geographic Region General Ed. Requirement, DSAS Second Language General Ed. Requirement, SCI Polymathic Contexts: Global & Cross Cul GE. Req.

 

GER 0202 – Intermediate German 2

Times: MWF 12:10-1:00 (Harms)

This is the second part of our intermediate language course sequence. These courses will provide students with opportunities to further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, to strengthen their grammatical knowledge and expand their vocabulary. We will work with the second part of the German textbook Netzwerk B1, and read an adapted version of Am kürzeren Ende der Sonnenallee, a novel about growing up in the GDR. Students will continue to work towards the B1-level of the Common European Framework of Reference.

Attributes: DSAS Geographic Region General Ed. Requirement, SCI Polymathic Contexts: Global & Cross Cul GE. Req.

 

GER 0204 – Intensive Intermediate German 2
Times: MTWThF 12:10-1:00 (Brand)

This is the second part of our intensive intermediate language course sequence. The class meets every day and thus allows students to develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, to strengthen their grammatical knowledge and expand their vocabulary at a faster pace than in the regular courses. Students will continue to work towards the B1-level of the Common European Framework of Reference.

Attributes: DSAS Geographic Region General Ed. Requirement, SCI Polymathic Contexts: Global & Cross Cul GE. Req.

 

GER 1001 – German Writing

Times: TuTh 9:25-10:40 (Lyon)

To view the interactive pdf for GER 1001, click here.

Please click on the GER 1001 pdf for the readable course details. They are written on this image on a purple background.

GER 1004 – The German Business (Eco)system

Times: T/Th 4:30-5:45 (Staff)

Click here for the GER 1004 course promotional video.

To view the interactive pdf for GER 1004, click here.

German 1004 Details are listed here, but the full pdf can be found using the link.

Subject-oriented, authentic texts and videos serve as the vehicle for an efficient and accelerated introduction to business German. The course emphasizes both receptive (reading and listening) and productive (speaking and writing) skills.

This is an advanced language course that aims to familiarize students with specialized vocabulary, practices and the culture of German-speaking countries with respect to professional areas, specifically the business world. As one of a two-part Professional German series, this course concentrates on the following areas: Industry (locations, branches, importance), Economy (trade within Germany, the EU, and non-EU countries), Environment (role, policy, importance), as well as Alternative and Renewable Energies (in Germany, in the EU, technology, policy & importance). The course focuses on oral and aural proficiency, appropriate written discourse, and reading. Students will have the opportunity to evaluate and compare German, EU and US practices with respect to industry, trade, technology, energy, and the environment. The course integrates the economic geography and business culture of all German-speaking countries in Europe: Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. PREQ: GER 0004 (MIN GRADE: B-)

Attributes: European and Eurasian Studies, European Union Studies, Transatlantic Studies, West European Studies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GER 1102 – The German-Speaking World Today

Times: MW 3:25-4:40pm (Harms)

To view the interactive pdf for GER 1102, click here.

This is the course description flyer for the German-speaking World Today. See interactive pdf for text info.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GER 1105 – Literary Analysis

Times: T/Th 11:05-12:20pm (Von Dirke)

To view the interactive pdf for GER 1105, click here.

Spring Term 2021 Literary Analysis Course: German 1105; Lit Gen Ed. This image  consists of a colorful bookshelf that is University-of-Pittsburgh-themed.

Why do people around the globe tell stories to each other? Howand whydid this cultural practicedevelop? What forms did it takeand what function has it fulfilled and, finally,what is its current form and significance for us today? These are the guiding questions for this course which integrates literary-critical analysis in the narrow sense with the broader conceptual framework of classical rhetoric which defines narrative as one of the four modes of discourse-description, exposition, argumentation–being the other ones.

In short, this course introduces students toconceptual frameworks, analytic methods and scholarly terminology of critical textual analysis in order to read “between the lines.” It also appliesthese literary-critical methodstonon-literary texts from journalism and historiography to marketing pitches/advertisement and political platforms to scientific discourse to demonstrate how they help us to become critical readers of implicit messages. In addition, the course explores what happens when specific narratives travel from one into another medium, in particular toaudio-visual genres such “Literaturverfilmungen.” Finally, complex German grammatical structures and semantic fields are reviewed as necessary.

In summary, this course allows students to strengthen their analytic-critical reading skills beyond the confines of literary texts and equips them with tools for critical reading across genre and media. Materials and language of instruction: GERMAN. Prerequisite: successful completion of one 1000-level

Attributes: DSAS Literature General Ed. Requirement, SCI Polymathic Contexts: Humanistic GE. Req., European and Eurasian Studies, West European Studies

GER 1252 – Current Literature & Culture

Times: T/Th 1:15-2:30pm (Colin)

In this course, students concentrate on the most recent trends in German literature and culture. Readings from a variety of genres and authors are discussed in the larger context of cultural trends and traditions which have a bearing on current literary and other issues. All readings are in German. PREQ: GER 1001 or 1001

Attributes: West European Studies

GER 1350 – German Drama

Times: MW 5:00-6:15pm (Lukic)

To view the interactive pdf for GER 1350, click here.

Analyze, adapt, and perform a German drama. All readings and discussions will be in German. 

PREQ: Any 1000-level GER course (MIN GRADE: B-).

Attributes: DSAS Creative Work General Ed. Requirement, SCI Polymathic Contexts: Global&Cross Cul GE. Req., European and Eurasian Studies, West European Studies

GER 1500 – Germanic Myths, Legends and Sagas

Times: [LEC] MW 12:10-1:00 (Colin); [REC] Th 10-10:50 (Staff), Th 12:10-1:00 (Staff)

This course presents a survey of Northern European cultural values from about 500 B.C. To about 1500 A.D. Sources include archaeological finds, sagas, ballads, legends, customs, superstitions, place names, and language expressions. Topics include social organization, distribution of labor and wealth, the position of women and children in family and society, and the uses of supernatural beliefs to achieve worldly goals. Where appropriate, parallels will be drawn between modern Northern European values and their formative myths from the distant past.

Attributes: DSAS Geographic Region General Ed. Requirement, DSAS Literature General Ed. Requirement, Children's Literature, Medieval & Renaissance Studies, SCI Polymathic Contexts: Global&Cross Cul GE. Req., SCI Polymathic Contexts: Humanistic GE. Req., European and Eurasian Studies, West European Studies

This flyer describes the Germanic Myths Course and has a black background and red text.

GER 1502 – Indo-European Folktales

Times:  [LEC] MW 2:20-3:10 (Brand); [REC] Th 10-10:50 (Staff), Th 11:05-11:55 (Kurash), Th 12:10-1:00 (Kurash), F 10:00-10:50 (Staff), F 11:05-11:55 (Staff), F 12:10-1:00 (Kurash), F 1:15-2:05 (Brand)

Click here for the GER 1502 course promotional video.

To view the interactive pdf for GER 1502, click here.

Indo European Folktale Course Details: Click on interactive pdf for text info. A blond women with a red hood is depicted on a blue and cream-colored background.

 

GER 1504 – European Identity Between History and European Union Cultural Policy

Times:  T/Th 2:50-4:05 (Von Dirke)

To view the interactive pdf for GER 1504, click here.

This image contains the course description for German 1504 on a white background with an image that shows the flags of the EU member states.

This course is explores the state of the European union today with respect to the issue of collective identity formation by integrating the historical development of the EU with studying its evolving institutional structure. The course examines how culture which was originally only an afterthought of European integration has gained in importance since the overarching permissive consensus with which European populations passively supported the integration process began to crumble with the Maastricht treaty of 1992. Through a variety of sources from across the social sciences, political theory and social philosophy, the course elucidates how EU cultural policy aims to engender a transnational European identity.

Attributes: DSAS Geographic Region General Ed. Requirement, SCI Polymathic Contexts: Global & Cross Cul GE. Req., European and Eurasian Studies, European Union Studies, Russian & East European Studies, West European Studies

GER 1548 – New German Cinema

Times: T/Th 1:15-2:30 (Halle)

Click here for the GER 1548 promotional video.

To view the interactive pdf for GER 1548, click here.

This image is white and red with course info for New German Cinema, a German Course cross-listed with Film Studies. View the interactive pdf for course details.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GER 1550 – Computational Methods in Humanities

Times: MWF 10:00-10:50 (Birnbaum)

This course introduces students to the use of computational modeling and programming to conduct text-based research in the humanities. Course goals include 1) learning how to identify research questions in the humanities that are amenable to computational analysis and processing and 2) designing and implementing XML-based computational systems to explore those questions. No prior programming experience or knowledge of foreign languages required. (Requirements 3.25 GPA)

Attributes: DSAS Quant.-Formal Reason General Ed. Requirement, SCI Polymathic Contexts: Soc/Behav. GE. Req., University Honors Course

HUN 1615 – Outsiders on the Margins: The Aftermath of Socialism on Film

Times: M 3:25-5:55 (Batista)

To view the interactive pdf for HUN 1615, click here.

This image shows the course description for HUN 1615 on a navy, red, and yellow background. View the pdf for interactive text.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GER 1901 – Independent Study

GER 1902 – Directed Study

GER 1905 – German Internship 1

GER 1906 – German Internship 2

GER 1990 – Senior Thesis

GER 2902 – Directed M.A. Study

* 1500-level courses are taught in English, and therefore do not count towards the Major or Certificate unless special arrangements with the Director of Undergraduate Studies have been made.